Contributors


Anne Agee is
Executive Director Department of Instructional Improvement and Instructional Technology (DoIIIT) at George Mason University.

Anne Aronson
is Associate Professor and Co-Chair of the Writing Department at Metropolitan State University. She teaches courses in basic writing, professional writing, rhetorical theory and women's studies. Her research interests include feminist theory and composition, social class and writing, and adult student writers.

Brian Barker received his MFA from George Mason University in 1999. He is working on his PhD in literature at University of Houston. His poems have appeared in The Cream City Review, The Wisconsin Review, Poet Lore, Phoebe, and The Sandhill Review.

Mark Bernstein, for more than a decade, has been president and chief scientist of Eastgate Systems, Inc., a pioneer company in the development of hypermedia and hypertext writing tools, and publishers of original hypertexts--poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Eastgate Systems, founded in 1982, was referred to in the New York Times as "the New Directions of electronic publishing," a reference to the famous vanguard print publishing house, in recognition of the high innovative and intellectual quality of the company's products. At Eastgate, Bernstein, a Harvard-trained scientist, has created and managed hypertext tools and technologies, including the Storyspace hypertext writing environment which has been widely regarded as the tool of choice for serious and literary hypertext.

Hans Bergmann teaches and writes about 19th century American literature. He is the author of God in the Street, an interdisciplinary study of New York writing from the penny press to Herman Melville. Visit Hans Bergmann's home page.

F.L. Carr is a graduate student in the Cultural Studies Program at George Mason University. She is the technical assistant for the English Matters Collective. She is writing her dissertation on nineteenth-century dime novels for women and their role in gender, class, and race formations at the turn-of-the-century.

Peter Denning is Professor of Computer Science and University Coordinator for Process Reengineering at George Mason University. Since joining GMU in 1991, he served as vice provost for continuing professional education, associate dean for computing, and chair of the Computer Science Department in the School of Information Technology and Engineering. He is founding director emeritus of the Hyperlearning Center, formerly the Center for the New Engineer, which he founded in 1993. He co-inventor of the Hyperlearning Meter, a patented system for on-line self-assessment and certification.

Denning has published six books and 260 articles on computers, networks, and their operating systems. His two most recent books, Beyond Calculation and Talking Back to the Machine, examine the next fifty years of computing. He is working on two more books, one about the great principles of information technology and the other advising young professionals on what the IT field holds for them.

Ruth Overman Fischer is a Visiting Assistant Professor in English and the Director of Composition. She earned her Ph. D. in English with emphasis in Rhetoric and Linguistics from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1997. Her dissertation investigated the long term effects on teachers of their participation in a summer institute of a National Writing Project site. She has presented at the conventions of the College Composition and Communication, the National Council of Teachers of English, and the Modern Language Association, in addition to the previous two Writing Across the Curriculum Conferences. She is a faculty member in Women's Studies, a Teacher/Consultant with the Northern Virginia Writing Project, and a member of the GMU chapter of the National Coalition Building

Jim Henry is Associate Professor of English at George Mason. His book, Writing Workplace Cultures: An Archaeology of Professional Writing, is forthcoming from Southern Illinois University Press. His current research focuses on performance theory as it might be used to interpret writing as performance, writing performance in organizational settings, and annual performance reviews.

John O'Connor. During the calendar year 2000, John O'Connor, Dean of New Century College, will be on leave from George Mason University and will be a Visiting Scholar at the American Association for Higher Education (AAHE) in Washington DC. At AAHE, Dean O'Connor will be coordinating higher education organizations and associations working to support campus civic responsibility and democratic engagement.

Martin K. Wright, since 1998, has taken on the roles of Project Manager, Web Administrator, and Lead Web Designer at the Internet Multimedia Center (IMC) at George Mason University. Martin has contributed significantly to projects such as Planned Community Networks (PCN), The Internet Technology Innovation Center (ITIC), and The Virginia Museum's Virtual Art Room (VAVA). Martin is an expert of Systems Networking. He has worked as a System Administrator for one of the major law firms in the Northern Virginia area, managing Microsoft Windows NT Servers, SQL Servers, Exchange Servers, and Internet Servers. Martin has also worked as a Microsoft Windows NT Technician for Erols Internet ISP. He has experience in many different operating systems and architectures. He has extensive knowledge of hypertext markup language (HTML), dynamic hypertext markup language (DHTML), XML, Macromedia Flash, and cutting edge streaming technologies.

Lesley Smith received her Master of Fine Arts (poetry) from George Mason University. She teaches in New Century College.

Jim Sparrow is coordinator of Technology Across the Curriculum at GMU and director of the Blackout History Project.

Kenneth Thompson is Visiting Assistant Professor of English and coordinator of the Information Society Linked Courses Program at George Mason University. He is also a special editor for Monuments and Dust, an online museum of Victorian London.



Special thanks to the following organizations for their generous support:

Center for History and New Media
George Mason University Writing Center
The College of Arts and Sciences at
George Mason University